An unseasonable poem by Norman Nicholson 

South Cumberland, 16 May 1943


The sun has set

Behind Black Combe and the lower hills,

But northward in the sky the fells

Like gilded galleons on a sea of shadow

Float sunlit yet.

The liquid light

Soaks into the dry motes of the air,

Bright and moist until the flood of dawn;

Shoals of swifts round the market tower

Swim with fish-like flight.

Six days ago

The fells were limed with snow; the starlings on the chimney pots

Shook the falling flakes off their tin feathers.

May gives a sample of four seasons’ weathers

For a week on show.

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Trouble at Mill


A cold, wet, windy weekend in store so what better excuse to settle down with some yarn, a good book, radio on one side, shelties on the other.  The lentil Hashis Parmentier in the slow cooker. 
One of the programmes I am looking forward to this weekend is Poetry Extra on radio 4 extra tomorrow afternoon.   I don’t read much poetry but there are 5 poets who I do read and re-read constantly – John Clare, Edward Thomas, Adam Thorpe, Ivor Gurney and Norman Nicholson.  If you know these poets you can probably see a common theme. 
Here is Coastal Journey, taken from Norman Nicholson’s Collected Poems.

Poetry Extra – Provincial Pleasures – Norman Nicholson – @BBCRadio4Extra http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09b6qt1

African Burying Ground Memorial Park (Portsmouth, NH) — New England Nomad

Date Of Visit: October 7, 2017 Location: 386 State St, Portsmouth, NH Hours: open daily, 24 hours a day Cost: Free Parking: There is not a parking lot for the memorial but there is limited metered parking on State St (free before 8 a.m.) Handicapped Accessible: Yes Dog Friendly: Yes Website: African Burying Ground Memorial Park […]

via African Burying Ground Memorial Park (Portsmouth, NH) — New England Nomad

Doggy update


After a couple of worrying bouts of poor health, both Max and Heidi are doing well.  


We’ve been out and about, mostly to our favourite dog walking place along the sea front promenade at Waterloo.  We usually walk up along the wide stretch of grass behind the ever changing dunes, then walk back down in front of the dunes along the concreted promenade above the beach.