Waterloo Marina

The forecast said rain, a glance out of the window said otherwise, so, after a knocked together lunch from yesterday’s leftover mushroom and courgette stew, tarted up with some spinach, pasta and smoked paprika, we headed out in the car for the coast.  

The outgoing tide attracted flocks of waders, gulls, oyster catchers, black-headed gulls, and some I haven’t yet been able to identify, all running along the shore at the receding waters.  

Inland as we turned from the beach towards the marina we passed pochards, tufted ducks and more black headed gulls and what I think could be a Bean Goose.

I stopped to talk to another dog walker with a pair of young Tibetan Terriers before turning back to complete the circuit by retracing my steps, returning to the shore.

Along the cast iron shore

Some pictures from this morning’s walk from Waterloo Marina. I come here often because of the flat smooth surface which makes it ideal for Heidi’s buggy.  We had already made a visit to Stanley Park before breakfast, and as soon as I had finished my bowl of cereal, brushed my teeth and ran my fingers through my hair, I bundled the dogs off into the car and drove the seven miles to the marina car park at Waterloo.

 

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Usual Sunday morning boating activities taking place on the boating lake.  I normally take in a stroll round the lake and then back home – but today decided to continue along the promenade.  At Blundellsands we abandoned the prom for the grassy bank behind the sand dunes, very popular with dog walkers.  I try to encourage Heidi to get out of her buggy and take some exercise along this stretch of the walk.  But soon she was back in the buggy and we were striding along the prom heading towards the top car park and the prospect of a bag of chips from the mobile burger van.  Little Miss Hoppalong was a big hit with the caterers and was offered a sausage to share with Max.  We sat for a while enjoying our lunch and enjoying the views across the estuary.

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Early morning walk round Ufton Fields

It was hot.

Too hot to be out with the dogs.  I promised them a late night walk after sunset but it was still too hot to be out.  The next day would be hotter still, so I prepared for a very early stroll round Ufton Fields first thing in the morning.  At least most of the walk would be in the shade.

 

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Ufton Fields was an old quarry that has been left to go wild and is now owned by the Warwickshire Wildlife Trust. There is a single track circling the perimeter with a number of offshoots and areas for play and exploration.  The track had become quite overgrown since I was here last.

 

 

The path winds round a couple of the larger quarry pits, surrounded by large woodlands before opening out.  Not much sight of wildlife though I could hear a constant call of the chiffchaff, the angry ticking of a blackbird and the rasping flap of pigeons wings.

 

 

Once out in the open the brambles,  shrubs and thistles dominated the walk, sometimes making it difficult to manage the buggy.  If yellow is the colour of spring then the colour of summer is definitely purple.

 

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The path began to widen as we made our final way through the woods and back where we began, hot and bothered.  I had to wait for Max to catch up as he panted his slow way along the path.  The day was already hot and it was not yet eight o’clock.

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Max’s Birthday Treat

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My Boy – Max – 9 years old today.    He has been a member of my pack for nearly 8 years.

As Heidi cannot manage long walks, the boy and I have an occasional boys only day out.

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This morning we had a ramble across the field to the next village.

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This took us to one of the sources of the River Nene.

 

H.E. Bates reckoned the name of the river was a distortion of the word Nine – indicating the number of sources that fed into it.

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The rooks assemble every evening in the trees round the village green then they fly off before dusk.  I’ve often wondered where they go to.  Could this be their rookery?

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Passing fields of rapeseed and through gaps in the hedge . . .

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before retracing our steps back to the village

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The Clump.

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and home once more

 

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